A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

“A sad day for Australian journalism”: reaction from Twitter to the detail of #ABCcuts Many thousands of words will be written and spoken in coming days, weeks and months about the impact of the 400-plus job cuts and closures announced today by the ABC. In the...

read more
4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

Collecting information to disseminate worldwide is the main activity involved in journalism. It can feature many challenges as a profession, but when you approach it with utmost sincerity, the going gets easy. Harrowing experiences may have to be reported through your...

read more
Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can journalists learn to trust the public? Are we open to collaborating with community groups? This Q and A with Professor Robert Picard raises plenty of questions on the future of journalism The emerging crisis in the Australian media industry is likely to galvanise...

read more

JOURNALISM CHANNEL

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

“A sad day for Australian journalism”: reaction from Twitter to the detail of #ABCcuts Many thousands of words will be written and spoken in coming days, weeks and months about the impact of the 400-plus job cuts and closures announced today by the ABC. In the...

Inside The Emerging Cottage Industry Of Journalism Futures

Inside The Emerging Cottage Industry Of Journalism Futures

In the introduction to a new book, What’s Next in Journalism? new-media entrepreneurs tell their stories, journalist and academic Margaret Simons predicts that the most interesting future developments in news media will involve the proliferation of smaller, specialist...

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

“A sad day for Australian journalism”: reaction from Twitter to the detail of #ABCcuts Many thousands of words will be written and spoken in coming days, weeks and months about the impact of the 400-plus job cuts and closures announced today by the ABC. In the...

MODELS OF JOURNALISM

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

Collecting information to disseminate worldwide is the main activity involved in journalism. It can feature many challenges as a profession, but when you approach it with utmost sincerity, the going gets easy. Harrowing experiences may have to be reported through your...

Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can journalists learn to trust the public? Are we open to collaborating with community groups? This Q and A with Professor Robert Picard raises plenty of questions on the future of journalism The emerging crisis in the Australian media industry is likely to galvanise...

Apply To The Public Interest Journalism Foundation’s Pozible Channel

Apply To The Public Interest Journalism Foundation’s Pozible Channel

The Public Interest Journalism Foundation has established a fund-raising channel at Pozible to support those seeking to crowdsource funding for worthwhile journalism projects. Applicants are asked to address the questions below and email it to Bill Birnbauer, the...

FOUNDATION SPONSORS

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

Collecting information to disseminate worldwide is the main activity involved in journalism. It can feature many challenges as a profession, but when you approach it with utmost sincerity, the going gets easy. Harrowing experiences may have to be reported through your...

read more
Inside The Emerging Cottage Industry Of Journalism Futures

Inside The Emerging Cottage Industry Of Journalism Futures

In the introduction to a new book, What’s Next in Journalism? new-media entrepreneurs tell their stories, journalist and academic Margaret Simons predicts that the most interesting future developments in news media will involve the proliferation of smaller, specialist...

read more
A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

“A sad day for Australian journalism”: reaction from Twitter to the detail of #ABCcuts Many thousands of words will be written and spoken in coming days, weeks and months about the impact of the 400-plus job cuts and closures announced today by the ABC. In the...

read more
Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can journalists learn to trust the public? Are we open to collaborating with community groups? This Q and A with Professor Robert Picard raises plenty of questions on the future of journalism The emerging crisis in the Australian media industry is likely to galvanise...

read more

LONG READS

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

Collecting information to disseminate worldwide is the main activity involved in journalism. It can feature many challenges as a profession, but when you approach it with utmost sincerity, the going gets easy. Harrowing experiences may have to be reported through your...

OUR BLOG

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

Collecting information to disseminate worldwide is the main activity involved in journalism. It can feature many challenges as a profession, but when you approach it with utmost sincerity, the going gets easy. Harrowing experiences may have to be reported through your medium, which could be hard when humanity forms a haze around your profession. Staying within the ethical limits of your career is always important. Journalism has several branches that most people or aspirants are unaware of. When selecting it as a profession, you must be prepared to take the challenges head-on to percolate the facts through the public platforms. If you are interested in pursuing a career in journalism, here is a list of the various types you can explore.

1. Investigative Journalism

In investigative journalism, a topic concerning the vast areas of politics, economy, or scams can be researched and exposed by delivering evidence to the audience. Multiple tactics have to be used in order to collect information about the subject on the table. Once all the evidence has been collected, the journalists will have to write comprehensive reports about the topic to expose the issue’s intensity. Investigative journalism can be a part of both broadcast and print media.

Investigative

2. Watch Dog Journalism

As the name suggests, this type of journalism acts as a vigilante to perform its best to guard the society against the evil activities of politicians and corporations. In this form of journalism, you are exposing information about the subjects, but through an entirely different process. All scams or details regarding influential figures are investigated by these journalists to be let open into the public. Any negative impacts of the politicians or corporations’ activities can be eluded by investing more time into researching their underhand tactics to stay relevant.

3. Online Journalism

Digital newspapers, social media, or blogs are prevalent these days, and it seems to be the future of all media applications. Online journalism involves all these aspects, combining the best of all the information available. Content has to be hunted by online journalists at all times in order to post reports about anything and everything that concerns the public interests. The advantage of online journalism is that you get to act on your own will without acquiescing to the policies of an organization. Quick delivery of information through online platforms make it easier for the public to access the latest updates.

Online Journalism

4. Broadcast Journalism

Radio and television are the two major broadcast media being used worldwide. Everything from sports, weather, news, and traffic to entertainment is covered in broadcast journalism. It can also include watchdog and investigative journalism as a part of their services by adding a slot for all programs on their chart. By being a broadcast journalist, you will have to either read reports without corresponding videos or narrate reports with the supporting videos. You may also get the opportunity to head to the field of events to capture live video.

Opinion journalism, sports journalism, trade journalism, entertainment journalism, and political journalism are the other major journalism branches.

Inside The Emerging Cottage Industry Of Journalism Futures

Inside The Emerging Cottage Industry Of Journalism Futures

In the introduction to a new book, What’s Next in Journalism? new-media entrepreneurs tell their stories, journalist and academic Margaret Simons predicts that the most interesting future developments in news media will involve the proliferation of smaller, specialist enterprises.

Thanks to Scribe Publications for allowing publication of this extract.

Margaret Simons writes:

MegSimonsWe are living through a very exciting but also rather frightening transformation. For the first time in human history, most people in developed countries can publish their news and thoughts to the world within a few minutes of deciding to do so.

Publication disrupts power relationships, and over time can change our idea of what it means to be human, and what it means to be part of a society. Think about those who lived in the centuries following the last big technological innovation in disseminating news and views. Martin Luther’s ideas about the relationship between God and man took hold throughout Europe largely because he was able to publish them. Christopher Columbus was thought of as the discoverer of the Americas because he published the accounts of his voyage. The Vikings had been there before, and the native Americans long before that, but they had no printing press. The Enlightenment was enabled by scientists being able to access and read each other’s work. The French Revolution was brewed around the illicit printing presses in the ghettos of Paris, and the Boston Tea Party was planned in the living room of the editor of the local newspaper. The US constitution contained a guarantee of freedom of the press, because by the time it was written it was clear that publication was a radical extension of the ability of citizens to gather and work through their common concerns.

All of the changes detailed above came about because of the Gutenberg printing press. Another side effect of that innovation was the creation, over a century or two, of the newspaper, and the profession of journalism. Eventually the newspapers started by individual entrepreneurs grew into the big industrial-sized news-media organisations of our own time, employing dozens and sometimes hundreds of professional journalists.

Now we are living through a time of equivalent change, threat, and opportunity. It is impossible to know where this will take us, or how we will conceive of ourselves in a century’s time, but one thing is certain: the news media industry, and the profession of journalism, will change fundamentally.

One effect of the ability of everyone to publish their own material is that the mainstream news media, particularly newspapers, are in decline. This is not because of any reduced appetite for the core product. Contrary to what is often stated, there is no evidence at all that people in Australia have lost their hunger for news and information. Quite the contrary. There are more readers of newspaper content — whether it is delivered online or in hard copy — than ever before. Our main commercial television channels have spawned multichannels in the last few years, and many more news bulletins through the day. All these news services draw healthy audiences, and the viewer figures tell us many people watch multiple news programs in a single day. Add to that the constant swapping of news and views on Facebook and Twitter, through text messages and blogs, and we can see that news remains at the centre of our lives. The historian Mitchell Stephens has said that news is a basic human need. Every human society ever studied has had the means to disseminate news, so we can be fairly confident that we will continue to do so, particularly because the tools are better and more efficient than any human beings have had previously.1 But what about journalism?

The mainstream media’s decline is about business models, not appetite for news. The classified advert, which once brought easy revenue to broadsheet newspaper companies, has all but disappeared, replaced by more efficient online advertising sites, many of which are free to use. At the same time, we are fragmenting as an audience. Once the family gathered around one screen to watch the 6.00 p.m. news. Now, news is all pervasive, most homes have many screens, and there are fewer times or occasions when we gather together to share the same media content. Since the business model of mainstream media has depended on ‘mass’ — on gathering audiences in a single place and selling their attention to advertisers — this is a problem for the revenue that pays journalists’ salaries in the big industrial-news complexes.

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

“A sad day for Australian journalism”: reaction from Twitter to the detail of #ABCcuts

Many thousands of words will be written and spoken in coming days, weeks and months about the impact of the 400-plus job cuts and closures announced today by the ABC. In the meantime, see some of the reaction from journalists and others on Twitter, and beneath the tweets are links to recommended reading.

Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can journalists learn to trust the public? Are we open to collaborating with community groups? This Q and A with Professor Robert Picard raises plenty of questions on the future of journalism

The emerging crisis in the Australian media industry is likely to galvanise the community sector and philanthropists to engage with the reinvention of journalism. So says Professor Robert Picard, a leading authority on media economics and management and government communications policies, and the Director of Research at the Reuters Institute, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. Professor Picard recently delivered lectures at the National Press Club and the University of Canberra, where he also consulted on development of a research agenda for the News and Media Research Centre. In a Q and A published in full below, he says that journalists need to become more open to developing partnerships with the community sector, although this will require a significant cultural shift.

“One thing I’ve always said about journalists, and as an ex journalist, is that a lot of journalists don’t like the public – ‘please don’t call me about my article’,” he said. “In the training and the mythology of journalism, we are the school-master of the people. It’s the great unwashed out there, we’re supposed to educate them and direct them…that’s a terrible view of the public. And in fact one needs to be partnering with them.

“It is a cultural shift but it has to happen because the way we interact in a digital world requires interactions, transparency and trust – that haven’t necessarily been evident between media companies, journalists and the audience, which we didn’t really trust.” In an era where many people and organisations are taking on some of the traditional roles of journalism, Professor Picard says it is imperative that journalists focus on how we can value add in servicing communities’ information needs.

To survive and prosper, journalists must focus more on providing analysis and contextual coverage, to help the community make sense of their information overload, rather than simply providing an account of who said or did what.

“Journalism isn’t an end to itself; journalism is a function that helps society,” said Professor Picard. “I agree that innovation will come as solutions to community problems.” While Australian philanthropists and foundations have not been anywhere near as proactive in supporting public interest journalism as in the US, Professor Picard expects this will change as the industry crisis grows. “In Australia the situation has been deteriorating, and it’s getting close to the point whether community and other foundations are going to say, ‘we’ve got a problem now’, whereas two years ago it may not have been perceived as that’,” he said. Organisations like the Public Interest Journalism Foundation have an important role in educating the wider community about the value of sustaining the worthwhile roles of journalism, he added.

As to the skills that journalists need for the future, Professor Picard says the core attribute of successful journalism remains unchanged: curiosity. He advises journalism students to do double majors, and to develop an area of expertise to enable more authoritative reporting. He also suggests there may be start-up opportunities in servicing the needs of expat and immigrant communities, pointing to a successful venture that is doing this in Sweden (as profiled here). While he predicts that print has a limited lifespan and says we are now in a transition period where “people need to try a lot of things”, Professor Picard is optimistic for the future and the reinvention of journalism.

“It’s a great time for journalism,” he said. “I think it’s one of the most exciting times, there are more opportunities for young journalists to do things in the future.”

Apply To The Public Interest Journalism Foundation’s Pozible Channel

Apply To The Public Interest Journalism Foundation’s Pozible Channel

The Public Interest Journalism Foundation has established a fund-raising channel at Pozible to support those seeking to crowdsource funding for worthwhile journalism projects.

Applicants are asked to address the questions below and email it to Bill Birnbauer, the secretary of the Foundation.

1. What is the public interest value of this journalism project? (please explain in less than 350 words).

2. What experience and skills do you have that would enable you to undertake this public interest journalism project? (please explain in less than 350 words).

3. Do you agree to abide by the MEAA code of ethics (http://www.alliance.org.au/code-of-ethics.html) and the Australian Press Council statements of principles? (http://www.presscouncil.org.au/statements-of-principles/)

4. Please provide your CV.

ABC And SBS Cuts Raise Profound Concerns For Democracy And Society

ABC And SBS Cuts Raise Profound Concerns For Democracy And Society

The Public Interest Journalism Foundation has condemned funding cuts to the ABC and SBS, which will undermine these organisations’ ability to fulfil their critical roles in producing journalism that serves the public interest.

The loss of 400 jobs and other cutbacks at the ABC (see here and here for details) will have serious consequences for the organisation’s capacity to produce quality journalism.The Foundation notes the concerns of senior journalist Quentin Dempster that the cuts will undermine editorial independence and local coverage, while promoting “churnalism”.The Foundation also notes concerns that have been raised about the impacts on regional, rural and remote areas.The Foundation urges politicians across the board to take note of the strength of public concern, as shown by the many thousands of Australians who have supported the campaign against the cuts run by the Community and Public Sector Union and the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance.

The Foundation is particularly concerned that the cuts come at a time when job losses and restructuring across the wider media industry have undermined the watchdog role of journalism.As a recent Foundation statement noted, the ability of journalists to hold governments and other powerful entities to account is under attack on multiple fronts, including from international trade negotiations, and federal legislation.The Foundation urges the Federal Government to explore a full range of mechanisms for encouraging diversity and sustainability in public interest journalism and the emergence of new media models.“Public interest journalism plays a central role in a healthy, safe and effective democratic society,” said the Foundation’s Patron, Rob Oakeshott.

“It provides citizens with the information needed to participate in the democratic process. An informed public in an effective democracy requires public interest journalism in privately owned, government funded and non profit media organisations.

“The Public Interest Journalism Foundation joins with many thousands of Australians in expressing our deep concern at these funding cuts, and their impact upon the wellbeing of our society.“The cuts to the ABC and SBS make the Australian story harder to tell, and make it harder for public interest journalism to hold governments and its institutions to account.“We also express our concern for those losing jobs and facing uncertainty about their futures.”

The PIJ Is About Conversations, Collaborations And Experiments

The PIJ Is About Conversations, Collaborations And Experiments

The Public Interest Journalism Foundation (PIJ) is about conversations, collaborations and experiments that will help sustain public interest journalism, and therefore enhanced community well-being.

The Foundation was founded in 2009 as part of the Institute for Social Research at Swinburne University of Technology. The Foundation has a broad brief to develop new approaches to journalism that “maximize and explore the applications of emerging media technologies”. This comes in the wake of major technological, economic and demographic changes which are affecting the viability of established media organizations.

The Foundation is pursuing three initiatives in 2010, each designed to promote journalism of public importance in the new media age:

YouCommNews is an experiment in audience driven commissioning of journalism. YouCommNews is a website that brings journalists and the public together, without the necessary intervention of Big Media. People can directly commission the journalism they want to see done. YouCommNews has been established with the help of grants from the Victorian Department of Innovation, Industry and Regional development, the ARC funded Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, and philanthropic support from foundation sponsor, the Financial and Energy Exchange Group. Other donors include Professor John Langmore.

 
An Investigative and Public Interest Journalism Resource Centre

This centre, designed with the assistance of PIJ Foundation Board member Chris Masters, will bring together a range of resources and training opportunities with the aim of increasing the range, quality and depth of investigative journalism in Australia. The resources will include access to existing data bases of material as well as new data bases created by the centre, and professional training programs.

The New News 2010 – A Digital News Media Expo

PIJF will hold a groundbreaking two day conference on the future of journalism as part of the Melbourne Writers Festival, on 2nd and 3rd September 2010. This conference, to be held at the Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas will be about collaboration and creation, and about building new and creative relationships between newsmakers and audiences. This is an optimistic conference. It will go beyond tired old debates about bloggers versus journalists to embrace and bring together all those who are using new technologies to communicate and access news. New News 2010 will engage existing and new audiences in new media discussion and debate.

The New News 2010 will carry the immense potential of Web 2.0 for a healthier news media to the heart of cultural Melbourne and the wider Australian community. The New News 2010 will also include an “expo” in which innovators in journalism can display their work.

NEWEST

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

Collecting information to disseminate worldwide is the main activity involved in journalism. It can feature many challenges as a profession, but when you approach it with utmost sincerity, the going gets easy. Harrowing experiences may have to be reported through your...

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

“A sad day for Australian journalism”: reaction from Twitter to the detail of #ABCcuts Many thousands of words will be written and spoken in coming days, weeks and months about the impact of the 400-plus job cuts and closures announced today by the ABC. In the...

FEATURED

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

Collecting information to disseminate worldwide is the main activity involved in journalism. It can feature many challenges as a profession, but when you approach it with utmost sincerity, the going gets easy. Harrowing experiences may have to be reported through your...

Inside The Emerging Cottage Industry Of Journalism Futures

Inside The Emerging Cottage Industry Of Journalism Futures

In the introduction to a new book, What’s Next in Journalism? new-media entrepreneurs tell their stories, journalist and academic Margaret Simons predicts that the most interesting future developments in news media will involve the proliferation of smaller, specialist...

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

“A sad day for Australian journalism”: reaction from Twitter to the detail of #ABCcuts Many thousands of words will be written and spoken in coming days, weeks and months about the impact of the 400-plus job cuts and closures announced today by the ABC. In the...

Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can journalists learn to trust the public? Are we open to collaborating with community groups? This Q and A with Professor Robert Picard raises plenty of questions on the future of journalism The emerging crisis in the Australian media industry is likely to galvanise...