History of Journalism Education

History of Journalism Education

Journalism has traveled a long way over the years; there is no denial. Every part of the world has promoted operations of journalists owing to the fact that the public needs to know what happens behind the pretense being put up on the stage. Career options for...

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7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

One of the crucial roles of a reporter is to do thorough research before presenting facts as news. There is a lot that goes behind presenting a big story. Investigative journalism is gone through the previous reports, documents, verifying sources, and other...

read more
4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

Collecting information to disseminate worldwide is the main activity involved in journalism. It can feature many challenges as a profession, but when you approach it with utmost sincerity, the going gets easy. Harrowing experiences may have to be reported through your...

read more

JOURNALISM CHANNEL

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

One of the crucial roles of a reporter is to do thorough research before presenting facts as news. There is a lot that goes behind presenting a big story. Investigative journalism is gone through the previous reports, documents, verifying sources, and other...

History of Journalism Education

History of Journalism Education

Journalism has traveled a long way over the years; there is no denial. Every part of the world has promoted operations of journalists owing to the fact that the public needs to know what happens behind the pretense being put up on the stage. Career options for...

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

One of the crucial roles of a reporter is to do thorough research before presenting facts as news. There is a lot that goes behind presenting a big story. Investigative journalism is gone through the previous reports, documents, verifying sources, and other...

MODELS OF JOURNALISM

4 Things to Know About Becoming a Freelance Journalist

4 Things to Know About Becoming a Freelance Journalist

There are many good reasons to become a freelance journalist. You can independently investigate and work on articles that interests you, work from anywhere you want, and choose the media where you want to publish your articles. Another benefit is that you do not need...

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

Collecting information to disseminate worldwide is the main activity involved in journalism. It can feature many challenges as a profession, but when you approach it with utmost sincerity, the going gets easy. Harrowing experiences may have to be reported through your...

FOUNDATION SPONSORS

History of Journalism Education

History of Journalism Education

Journalism has traveled a long way over the years; there is no denial. Every part of the world has promoted operations of journalists owing to the fact that the public needs to know what happens behind the pretense being put up on the stage. Career options for...

read more
7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

One of the crucial roles of a reporter is to do thorough research before presenting facts as news. There is a lot that goes behind presenting a big story. Investigative journalism is gone through the previous reports, documents, verifying sources, and other...

read more
4 Things to Know About Becoming a Freelance Journalist

4 Things to Know About Becoming a Freelance Journalist

There are many good reasons to become a freelance journalist. You can independently investigate and work on articles that interests you, work from anywhere you want, and choose the media where you want to publish your articles. Another benefit is that you do not need...

read more

LONG READS

History of Journalism Education

History of Journalism Education

Journalism has traveled a long way over the years; there is no denial. Every part of the world has promoted operations of journalists owing to the fact that the public needs to know what happens behind the pretense being put up on the stage. Career options for...

OUR BLOG

How can Technology Support The Future of Public-Interest Journalism?

How can Technology Support The Future of Public-Interest Journalism?

Journalism has undoubtedly grown over the past several decades to percolate through multiple media, opening doors to various perspectives on a report. Many seminars have been held in the recent past, discussing the relevance and role of changing technology in the future of journalism. Although not everyone would be of the same opinion, most people hope to see a prosperous future for the industry with technology backing in the best way possible. Journalists are also able to solve their own issues by collaborating with contemporaries. Project-based collaborations involve several organizations working together to investigate a specific topic. Amalgamations of other sorts are also common in the journalism sector. Purpose-based, policy-based, and crisis-based are the three other common collaborations in journalism. Let us look at the apparent changes in journalism due to the introduction of multiple technological innovations.

The Shift in the Works of a Journalist

As society’s cultural and technological aspects are changing, the outlook of journalism is shifting to a more vast space that needs exploration and experimentation. Since technology has given birth to compact devices and short reports on major events, every journalist must find a way to stay relevant in the media. With the perpetuating rat race in every sector of work, journalists need to be extra alert to note the important details of all unforgettable episodes in a week.

Journalists are required to become more engaged with the desire of viewers and readers. Their mindset must be changed according to the challenges in hand; so, every journalist must develop computational thinking and antiracist thinking skills when thinking of collaboration. With the shift in culture and relationships, journalists also have to set up their own sensors to monitor the activities within all major sectors. Reports used to be created with precision only when government sources were exploited efficiently. However, the scene of journalism has changed for the best. Gathering data may not have become a cinch, but it has become an effective process in creating comprehensive reports about all current events.

current events.

While technology is growing to make the viewers’ lives simple, the journalists have to invest more time into investigating all the news reports they post or broadcast. When cases related to past events are brought into light again, journalists have to dig deeper and search for previous records. While it used to be a strenuous task in the past with unstructured repositories like printed documents and films, it has become more of a cinch these days with cloud and backup storage platforms available in galore.

All these efforts of journalists can meet the prosperous end only when technology is incorporated in the right way. Novel ideas can also find their place in the sector if technology adequately backs the functions. Data visualization software, sensors and scrapers, international databases, AI, Python, programming languages like Python and SQL, communication tools with dedicated servers, and advanced forums to share ideas and opinions are the pillars to journalism’s potential boom.

History of Journalism Education

History of Journalism Education

Journalism has traveled a long way over the years; there is no denial. Every part of the world has promoted operations of journalists owing to the fact that the public needs to know what happens behind the pretense being put up on the stage. Career options for journalism kept developing with every passing decade as the technology was gradually advancing. Although the particular sector has several drawbacks in terms of the risks involved, the demand for information will never fade, and so will be the dream of many aspirants to venture into journalism. The print media shaped public opinion as newspapers dropped in at the doorstep every morning to push out all the current affairs.

What initially was believed to have been a self-built empire developed educational requirements to find a place in the industry. All of this can only be the result of a growing population. Journalism education is believed to have been introduced in the nineteenth century. Professionals who were creating wonders and history in journalism with their talent had to go through several stages of debates to conclude that the aspirants need an arts degree to be qualified for a job in the journalism sector.

These discussions in the past did, however, bring many relevant topics to the front. Casteism and racism were subjects that always occupied the minds of the public. When it was about journalism education, equal rights for everyone became an issue. Countless problems were on the way to prosperity. Let us look at a brief history of journalism education.

journalism education

The Beginning and the Journey of Journalism

Professionalization was the topic that led to many protests and movements in the nineteenth century. The years following the Civil War had many groups of people vying for the top positions of the highest paid jobs. Everyone, including social workers, lawyers, business people, and journalists, wanted to have a separate class for their expertise. With this came higher authority in every field, meaning all the professionals wanted to be a part of the higher sect of individuals. For them to be raised over to such pedestals, training was imperative. Journalists also had to go through several stages of training to meet the accepted standards of the sector.

Universities and experts in the industry had to discuss the potential of the development of journalism education. Editing, writing, and copy reading weren’t all about the talent one possesses; instead, the candidate must have the skills to tackle every challenge with ease. Since many professionals recommended education as a crucial stage in the learning process, the government and universities agreed upon the programs to be offered. Since the welfare of the society had one of its pillars built on journalism, the establishment of its position in the structure was crucial.

It was in 1908 that the first journalism program was introduced. However, no much traction was developed in these programs until the mid-nineteenth century. Accreditation of journalism schools also began only in the late 1940s. It all led to the release of several theory-based and skill-based books and content for the aspirants to peruse. A balance was found in education over the years.

 

 

 

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

One of the crucial roles of a reporter is to do thorough research before presenting facts as news. There is a lot that goes behind presenting a big story. Investigative journalism is gone through the previous reports, documents, verifying sources, and other information to see if journalists can extract more data. For an investigative reporter, there are some helpful tools that can better manage the reports to get faster leads.

Hunter.io

Hunter is a tool to help track down contacts of people who are connected to the investigation. It can fish email addresses from government agencies (with permission). If Hunter fails to find the email you are looking for, it will still give you some options to try out.

investigation

IntelTechniques

IntelTechniques is an advanced level tool to help you search through a bunch of social media platforms. You can search for a person’s presence on social media to extract any intel that you get. You can find out about the pictures that your target has liked on a platform or the videos in which they are tagged.

YouTube DataViewer

This tool can help you find fresh sources on Youtube related to the event that you are covering. This tool by Amnesty International lets you reverse search the videos based on the images you have. However, you cannot gain authority on any of the videos and have to seek permission from the uploader to use it for your investigation.

Sqoop

Sqoop is a US-based website that helps the investigations to search through the records related to the businesses and government documents. You can also use the software to follow the cases related to your investigation and create new alerts for documents. The tool is free for journalists.

Evernote

Evernote is a free to use scanner and text-searcher that you can have on your mobile phone. It can store a large volume of notes, interviews, records on your phone. It is also useful in keeping track of your researches. You can store and access your documents easily without having to wait for your files to load.

researches

Botometer

Botometer is designed by university researchers in the US to provide a platform for reports to find authentic people. This tool can identify if a person on social media like Twitter is a real person or a bot. It is one of the best bot-spotting tools that you can have. It will help you find out if the comments made related to your investigation are made by real people or bots trying to divert the case.

Klaxon

Klaxon is a great tool for tracking websites and how they have changed in the past years. It is similar to the tools used in digital marketing to identify a spam website. It was developed by a journalist as a nonprofit tool. There is a long procedure to get your account verified on this free-to-use tool, but you can easily find out about the previous records of any website you want when you have done that.

4 Things to Know About Becoming a Freelance Journalist

4 Things to Know About Becoming a Freelance Journalist

There are many good reasons to become a freelance journalist. You can independently investigate and work on articles that interests you, work from anywhere you want, and choose the media where you want to publish your articles. Another benefit is that you do not need a qualification or criteria to become a freelance journalist. If you have quality content, the media will automatically approach you. But first, you need to prepare yourself to become a freelance journalist. You can learn from other freelancing writers and know how they make changes in their work according to the changing journalism environment. Here are five things that a freelance journalist must know before choosing this lifestyle.

The job title is not important

Many newcomers in freelance journalism start positive, but soon they realize that being a freelancer does not give them an actual job title. They face difficulty in deciding whether they can really put their title as a journalist. Since being a freelancer exposes you to different fields to cover, you cannot settle on just one journalism type. But it is nothing that you should worry about. There are no limits to what you can set as your job title. It is your work that will give you the recognition over time.

Do not be afraid of rejections

One of the common problems that you will deal with is rejections from the media houses as a freelancer. If they do not like your story, they will simply say so. As a beginner, you should be prepared to take rejections. It can cause stress and may also make you reconsider your choices until you overcome this phase and create the content that media houses will die to purchase. Keep sending our ideas and content even when you are facing rejection.

Join a freelance journalism community

Make allies in freelance journalism, who can help you find new leads and lookout for opportunities. It will feel good to meet new people who share the same interests and walk on the same path. Find the communities where freelance journalists share ideas and enjoy cracking jokes, so you know you are not alone who is trying to make a career as a freelancer. You can find everything from tips to even some roles you can take as a local freelance reporter for surveys.

journalism community

Build relations with media houses

A part of being a freelance journalist is to keep your demands first no matter how cold your email may sound. But before you start demanding, you need to make yourself known to a publisher or a media house. Take time to interact with writers and editors when there is nothing much going around your locality. Use your free time to develop your connect instead of approaching then only when you have something to sell. It will land you regular commissions as the editor will trust your work more when you have a healthy professional relationship.

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

4 Major Types of Journalism to Explore

Collecting information to disseminate worldwide is the main activity involved in journalism. It can feature many challenges as a profession, but when you approach it with utmost sincerity, the going gets easy. Harrowing experiences may have to be reported through your medium, which could be hard when humanity forms a haze around your profession. Staying within the ethical limits of your career is always important. Journalism has several branches that most people or aspirants are unaware of. When selecting it as a profession, you must be prepared to take the challenges head-on to percolate the facts through the public platforms. If you are interested in pursuing a career in journalism, here is a list of the various types you can explore.

1. Investigative Journalism

In investigative journalism, a topic concerning the vast areas of politics, economy, or scams can be researched and exposed by delivering evidence to the audience. Multiple tactics have to be used in order to collect information about the subject on the table. Once all the evidence has been collected, the journalists will have to write comprehensive reports about the topic to expose the issue’s intensity. Investigative journalism can be a part of both broadcast and print media.

Investigative

2. Watch Dog Journalism

As the name suggests, this type of journalism acts as a vigilante to perform its best to guard the society against the evil activities of politicians and corporations. In this form of journalism, you are exposing information about the subjects, but through an entirely different process. All scams or details regarding influential figures are investigated by these journalists to be let open into the public. Any negative impacts of the politicians or corporations’ activities can be eluded by investing more time into researching their underhand tactics to stay relevant.

3. Online Journalism

Digital newspapers, social media, or blogs are prevalent these days, and it seems to be the future of all media applications. Online journalism involves all these aspects, combining the best of all the information available. Content has to be hunted by online journalists at all times in order to post reports about anything and everything that concerns the public interests. The advantage of online journalism is that you get to act on your own will without acquiescing to the policies of an organization. Quick delivery of information through online platforms make it easier for the public to access the latest updates.

Online Journalism

4. Broadcast Journalism

Radio and television are the two major broadcast media being used worldwide. Everything from sports, weather, news, and traffic to entertainment is covered in broadcast journalism. It can also include watchdog and investigative journalism as a part of their services by adding a slot for all programs on their chart. By being a broadcast journalist, you will have to either read reports without corresponding videos or narrate reports with the supporting videos. You may also get the opportunity to head to the field of events to capture live video.

Opinion journalism, sports journalism, trade journalism, entertainment journalism, and political journalism are the other major journalism branches.

Inside The Emerging Cottage Industry Of Journalism Futures

Inside The Emerging Cottage Industry Of Journalism Futures

In the introduction to a new book, What’s Next in Journalism? new-media entrepreneurs tell their stories, journalist and academic Margaret Simons predicts that the most interesting future developments in news media will involve the proliferation of smaller, specialist enterprises.

Thanks to Scribe Publications for allowing publication of this extract.

Margaret Simons writes:

MegSimonsWe are living through a very exciting but also rather frightening transformation. For the first time in human history, most people in developed countries can publish their news and thoughts to the world within a few minutes of deciding to do so.

Publication disrupts power relationships, and over time can change our idea of what it means to be human, and what it means to be part of a society. Think about those who lived in the centuries following the last big technological innovation in disseminating news and views. Martin Luther’s ideas about the relationship between God and man took hold throughout Europe largely because he was able to publish them. Christopher Columbus was thought of as the discoverer of the Americas because he published the accounts of his voyage. The Vikings had been there before, and the native Americans long before that, but they had no printing press. The Enlightenment was enabled by scientists being able to access and read each other’s work. The French Revolution was brewed around the illicit printing presses in the ghettos of Paris, and the Boston Tea Party was planned in the living room of the editor of the local newspaper. The US constitution contained a guarantee of freedom of the press, because by the time it was written it was clear that publication was a radical extension of the ability of citizens to gather and work through their common concerns.

All of the changes detailed above came about because of the Gutenberg printing press. Another side effect of that innovation was the creation, over a century or two, of the newspaper, and the profession of journalism. Eventually the newspapers started by individual entrepreneurs grew into the big industrial-sized news-media organisations of our own time, employing dozens and sometimes hundreds of professional journalists.

Now we are living through a time of equivalent change, threat, and opportunity. It is impossible to know where this will take us, or how we will conceive of ourselves in a century’s time, but one thing is certain: the news media industry, and the profession of journalism, will change fundamentally.

One effect of the ability of everyone to publish their own material is that the mainstream news media, particularly newspapers, are in decline. This is not because of any reduced appetite for the core product. Contrary to what is often stated, there is no evidence at all that people in Australia have lost their hunger for news and information. Quite the contrary. There are more readers of newspaper content — whether it is delivered online or in hard copy — than ever before. Our main commercial television channels have spawned multichannels in the last few years, and many more news bulletins through the day. All these news services draw healthy audiences, and the viewer figures tell us many people watch multiple news programs in a single day. Add to that the constant swapping of news and views on Facebook and Twitter, through text messages and blogs, and we can see that news remains at the centre of our lives. The historian Mitchell Stephens has said that news is a basic human need. Every human society ever studied has had the means to disseminate news, so we can be fairly confident that we will continue to do so, particularly because the tools are better and more efficient than any human beings have had previously.1 But what about journalism?

The mainstream media’s decline is about business models, not appetite for news. The classified advert, which once brought easy revenue to broadsheet newspaper companies, has all but disappeared, replaced by more efficient online advertising sites, many of which are free to use. At the same time, we are fragmenting as an audience. Once the family gathered around one screen to watch the 6.00 p.m. news. Now, news is all pervasive, most homes have many screens, and there are fewer times or occasions when we gather together to share the same media content. Since the business model of mainstream media has depended on ‘mass’ — on gathering audiences in a single place and selling their attention to advertisers — this is a problem for the revenue that pays journalists’ salaries in the big industrial-news complexes.

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

A Sad Day For Australian Journalism

“A sad day for Australian journalism”: reaction from Twitter to the detail of #ABCcuts

Many thousands of words will be written and spoken in coming days, weeks and months about the impact of the 400-plus job cuts and closures announced today by the ABC. In the meantime, see some of the reaction from journalists and others on Twitter, and beneath the tweets are links to recommended reading.

Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can Journalists Learn To Trust The Public?

Can journalists learn to trust the public? Are we open to collaborating with community groups? This Q and A with Professor Robert Picard raises plenty of questions on the future of journalism

The emerging crisis in the Australian media industry is likely to galvanise the community sector and philanthropists to engage with the reinvention of journalism. So says Professor Robert Picard, a leading authority on media economics and management and government communications policies, and the Director of Research at the Reuters Institute, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford. Professor Picard recently delivered lectures at the National Press Club and the University of Canberra, where he also consulted on development of a research agenda for the News and Media Research Centre. In a Q and A published in full below, he says that journalists need to become more open to developing partnerships with the community sector, although this will require a significant cultural shift.

“One thing I’ve always said about journalists, and as an ex journalist, is that a lot of journalists don’t like the public – ‘please don’t call me about my article’,” he said. “In the training and the mythology of journalism, we are the school-master of the people. It’s the great unwashed out there, we’re supposed to educate them and direct them…that’s a terrible view of the public. And in fact one needs to be partnering with them.

“It is a cultural shift but it has to happen because the way we interact in a digital world requires interactions, transparency and trust – that haven’t necessarily been evident between media companies, journalists and the audience, which we didn’t really trust.” In an era where many people and organisations are taking on some of the traditional roles of journalism, Professor Picard says it is imperative that journalists focus on how we can value add in servicing communities’ information needs.

To survive and prosper, journalists must focus more on providing analysis and contextual coverage, to help the community make sense of their information overload, rather than simply providing an account of who said or did what.

“Journalism isn’t an end to itself; journalism is a function that helps society,” said Professor Picard. “I agree that innovation will come as solutions to community problems.” While Australian philanthropists and foundations have not been anywhere near as proactive in supporting public interest journalism as in the US, Professor Picard expects this will change as the industry crisis grows. “In Australia the situation has been deteriorating, and it’s getting close to the point whether community and other foundations are going to say, ‘we’ve got a problem now’, whereas two years ago it may not have been perceived as that’,” he said. Organisations like the Public Interest Journalism Foundation have an important role in educating the wider community about the value of sustaining the worthwhile roles of journalism, he added.

As to the skills that journalists need for the future, Professor Picard says the core attribute of successful journalism remains unchanged: curiosity. He advises journalism students to do double majors, and to develop an area of expertise to enable more authoritative reporting. He also suggests there may be start-up opportunities in servicing the needs of expat and immigrant communities, pointing to a successful venture that is doing this in Sweden (as profiled here). While he predicts that print has a limited lifespan and says we are now in a transition period where “people need to try a lot of things”, Professor Picard is optimistic for the future and the reinvention of journalism.

“It’s a great time for journalism,” he said. “I think it’s one of the most exciting times, there are more opportunities for young journalists to do things in the future.”

Apply To The Public Interest Journalism Foundation’s Pozible Channel

Apply To The Public Interest Journalism Foundation’s Pozible Channel

The Public Interest Journalism Foundation has established a fund-raising channel at Pozible to support those seeking to crowdsource funding for worthwhile journalism projects.

Applicants are asked to address the questions below and email it to Bill Birnbauer, the secretary of the Foundation.

1. What is the public interest value of this journalism project? (please explain in less than 350 words).

2. What experience and skills do you have that would enable you to undertake this public interest journalism project? (please explain in less than 350 words).

3. Do you agree to abide by the MEAA code of ethics (http://www.alliance.org.au/code-of-ethics.html) and the Australian Press Council statements of principles? (http://www.presscouncil.org.au/statements-of-principles/)

4. Please provide your CV.

ABC And SBS Cuts Raise Profound Concerns For Democracy And Society

ABC And SBS Cuts Raise Profound Concerns For Democracy And Society

The Public Interest Journalism Foundation has condemned funding cuts to the ABC and SBS, which will undermine these organisations’ ability to fulfil their critical roles in producing journalism that serves the public interest.

The loss of 400 jobs and other cutbacks at the ABC (see here and here for details) will have serious consequences for the organisation’s capacity to produce quality journalism.The Foundation notes the concerns of senior journalist Quentin Dempster that the cuts will undermine editorial independence and local coverage, while promoting “churnalism”.The Foundation also notes concerns that have been raised about the impacts on regional, rural and remote areas.The Foundation urges politicians across the board to take note of the strength of public concern, as shown by the many thousands of Australians who have supported the campaign against the cuts run by the Community and Public Sector Union and the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance.

The Foundation is particularly concerned that the cuts come at a time when job losses and restructuring across the wider media industry have undermined the watchdog role of journalism.As a recent Foundation statement noted, the ability of journalists to hold governments and other powerful entities to account is under attack on multiple fronts, including from international trade negotiations, and federal legislation.The Foundation urges the Federal Government to explore a full range of mechanisms for encouraging diversity and sustainability in public interest journalism and the emergence of new media models.“Public interest journalism plays a central role in a healthy, safe and effective democratic society,” said the Foundation’s Patron, Rob Oakeshott.

“It provides citizens with the information needed to participate in the democratic process. An informed public in an effective democracy requires public interest journalism in privately owned, government funded and non profit media organisations.

“The Public Interest Journalism Foundation joins with many thousands of Australians in expressing our deep concern at these funding cuts, and their impact upon the wellbeing of our society.“The cuts to the ABC and SBS make the Australian story harder to tell, and make it harder for public interest journalism to hold governments and its institutions to account.“We also express our concern for those losing jobs and facing uncertainty about their futures.”

NEWEST

History of Journalism Education

History of Journalism Education

Journalism has traveled a long way over the years; there is no denial. Every part of the world has promoted operations of journalists owing to the fact that the public needs to know what happens behind the pretense being put up on the stage. Career options for...

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

One of the crucial roles of a reporter is to do thorough research before presenting facts as news. There is a lot that goes behind presenting a big story. Investigative journalism is gone through the previous reports, documents, verifying sources, and other...

FEATURED

How can Technology Support The Future of Public-Interest Journalism?

How can Technology Support The Future of Public-Interest Journalism?

Journalism has undoubtedly grown over the past several decades to percolate through multiple media, opening doors to various perspectives on a report. Many seminars have been held in the recent past, discussing the relevance and role of changing technology in the...

History of Journalism Education

History of Journalism Education

Journalism has traveled a long way over the years; there is no denial. Every part of the world has promoted operations of journalists owing to the fact that the public needs to know what happens behind the pretense being put up on the stage. Career options for...

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

7 Essential Tools for Investigative Journalism

One of the crucial roles of a reporter is to do thorough research before presenting facts as news. There is a lot that goes behind presenting a big story. Investigative journalism is gone through the previous reports, documents, verifying sources, and other...

4 Things to Know About Becoming a Freelance Journalist

4 Things to Know About Becoming a Freelance Journalist

There are many good reasons to become a freelance journalist. You can independently investigate and work on articles that interests you, work from anywhere you want, and choose the media where you want to publish your articles. Another benefit is that you do not need...